House Passes a Bill Fought For by the NRA to LOOSEN Gun Regulations

The House of Representatives approved legislation Wednesday loosening gun regulations and allowing those with permits to carry concealed weapons to legally travel with those firearms to other states, a top priority of the National Rifle Association.

The bill passed mostly along party lines, 231-198, with six Democrats supporting it. Fourteen Republicans opposed the legislation, the first major firearms-related bill Congress has voted on since the massacres in Las Vegas and Texas earlier this year.
Republicans argued that Americans’ Second Amendment rights to bear arms should not end when they cross state lines.
“The Bill of Rights is not a philosophical exercise,” Georgia GOP Rep. Doug Collins, who personally had a concealed carry permit for what described as self-defense reasons. “I don’t think that right should be undermined simply because I travel to another state.”
Democrats angrily denounced the legislation, known as “concealed carry reciprocity.”
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Rep. Alcee Hastings, a Florida Democrat, called the bill “a disgraceful handout to the powerful gun lobby and gun manufacturers,” and said the party’s initials “GOP” should stand for “guns over people.”
The NRA had fiercely lobbied for its passing.
“This vote marks a watershed moment for Second Amendment rights,” said NRA executive director for legislative action Chris Cox. “The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act is the culmination of a 30-year movement recognizing the right of all law-abiding Americans to defend themselves, and their loved ones, including when they cross state lines.”
North Carolina GOP Rep. Richard Hudson, the author of the bill, recounted a story on the House floor about a woman from Pennsylvania with no criminal record who held a concealed carry permit for her pistol, which was not recognized when she traveled to New Jersey, and was later jailed.
“Are you serious? We have to make sure that never happens again,” Hudson said. He compared concealed carry permits to marriage licenses or divorce decrees, and drivers’ licenses, which are recognized in other states.